Pet Poison Prevention

March is National Pet Poison Prevention Month.

Signs of poisoning in dogs and cats can range tremendously based on the underlying poison. If you think your dog or cat has been poisoned, call the Magrane Pet Medical Center at (574) 259-5291 or Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680 immediately for assistance! When it comes to poisoning, the sooner you treat your dog or cat, the better the outcome.

While this list is not exhaustive or complete, some common signs of poisoning generally include:

Gastrointestinal signs

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Drooling/hypersalivating
  • Inappetance
  • Nausea

Internal bleeding

  • Coughing of blood
  • Vomiting blood
  • Pale gums
  • A racing heart rate
  • Weakness or lethargy
  • Collapse

Kidney failure

  • Halitosis (“uremic” breath)
  • Inappetance
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive thirst or urination
  • Absence or decreased urination

Liver failure

  • Jaundice/icterus/yellow discoloration to the gums
  • Weakness or collapse secondary to a low blood sugar
  • Dull mentation, acting abnormally
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Black-tarry stool (melena)

 

Take special care to keep these toxins out of your pet’s reach and pet-proof your house!

Dog Poisons:

  1. Chocolate
  2. Mouse and Rat Poisons (rodenticides)
  3. Vitamins and Minerals (e.g., Vitamin D3, iron, etc.)
  4. NSAIDs (e.g., ibuprofen, naproxen, etc.)
  5. Cardiac Medications (e.g., calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, etc.)
  6. Cold and Allergy Medications (e.g., pseudoephedrine, phenylephrine, etc.)
  7. Antidepressants (e.g., selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors)
  8. Xylitol
  9. Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol)
  10. Caffeine Pills

Cat Poisons:

  1. Topical spot-on insecticides
  2. Household Cleaners
  3. Antidepressants
  4. Lilies
  5. Insoluble Oxalate Plants (e.g., Dieffenbachia, Philodendron, etc.)
  6. Human and Veterinary NSAIDs
  7. Cold and Flu Medication (e.g., Tylenol)
  8. Glow Sticks
  9. ADD/ADHD Medications/Amphetamines
  10. Mouse and Rat Poison

If you suspect your pet has ingested any of these items or any other questionable substance, call Pet Poison Helpline or your veterinarian for assistance. Accurate and timely identification of the suspected substance is very important. Having the container, package, or label in hand will save valuable time and may save the life of your pet.

Source:  Pet Poison Hotline – http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/